Roma 2003 | Intersteno Italy | Internet contest
 
 


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TIRO WAITS FOR YOU!


INTERSTENO is back where shorthand was born.

More than 2000 years have passed, and Tiro has patiently waited for stenographers, educators, and others from all over the world to gather in the city where shorthand originated.

In the long journey throughout centuries, shorthand has not lost its original fascination and has kept stride with time and youth. Of course, so far pencils have lost their sharpness, clay and wax tablets are digitals, and stencil instruments appear as mouse, keyboard, or microphone; nevertheless, the need for rendering the spoken word in written text is definitely real.

Your date is in Rome, July 2003: INTERSTENO Congress will return to Italy!

The interest risen for the choice of this beautiful and historic place foretells a participation of over 500 people.

Will you be there?

Whatever is your relation to fast writing (economic, cultural, educational), you would surely like to be present.  If you have an idea of ancient shorthand and early typewriting, it will be great fun to verify what level of integration these matters have reached with computerization, thus enhancing the means for collecting and disseminating information.

Contests will be a great opportunity for touching with your hands the marriage of technology with human capabilities.

Your Italian colleagues await you. They will do their best to make this Congress unforgettable…not forgetting Tiro!

--------------------- Tiro the well-known private secretary of Cicero.  Tiro reported Cicero’s speeches in the Roman Senate using the Tironian system, devised circa 63 B.C., one of the most ancient forms of shorthand and a basis for future shorthand systems. (Roman poet Quintas Ennius is said to have devised a system of 1,100 signs as early as 200 B.C.)


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